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People

Current Corrosion Group

2015 Group Photo

 

2013 Corrosion Group

2013 Group Photo

 

2011 Corrosion Group

2011 Group Photo

 

Faculty & Staff

Preet Singh
Materials Science & Engineering
Professor
Materials Science and Engineering
IPST, 500 10th Street, N. W
Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0620
Phone (404) 894-6647
Fax: (404) 894-4778
preet.singh@mse.gatech.edu

Faculty Web Page

Scholarly Publications

Preet M. Singh is Professor at the School of Materials Science and Engineering at Georgia Tech.  Prof. Singh’s research is focused on different forms of environmental degradation of metallic materials including aqueous corrosion, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), corrosion fatigue and high temperature corrosion. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK in 1989. Prior to joining GaTech in 2003, Prof. Singh was an assistant professor and then associate professor at the Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST) since 1996. He has published over 100 papers in peer reviewed journals, books, and conference proceedings. His current research areas include corrosion and SCC of steels in ethanol fuels, SCC and corrosion fatigue (CF) of duplex stainless steels in pulping liquors, carbon steel tubes in high purity boiler water, corrosion resistant reinforcement steels for pre-stressed concrete structures, high temperature corrosion in recovery boilers and bio-gasifiers.

Jamshad Mahmood
Materials Science & Engineering
Mechanical Engineer II
Institute of Paper Science and
     Technology
IPST, 500 10th Street NW
Atlanta, GA 30332-0620
Phone: (404) 894-6647
Fax: (404) 894-4778
jamshad.mahmood@ipst.gatech.edu

Faculty Web Page

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Students

Kevin Chasse

Kevin Chasse
Materials Science & Engineering
PSE Grad Student as of Aug 2007
Graduate Research Assistant
kevin.chasse@mse.gatech.edu

Thesis: A Study on the Mechanism of Stress Corrosion Cracking of Duplex Stainless Steels in Alkaline Sulfide Environments

Resume

Kraft pulping makes use of white, black, and green liquors, which are highly corrosive, alkaline sulfide solutions. Duplex stainless steels (DSSs) have been selected for several critical pulp and paper applications, such as accumulators, clarifiers, and digesters. These two phase materials provide the benefits of both standard austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. Recent field and laboratory experience have shown that DSSs can become susceptible to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in hot alkaline sulfide solution. The austenite phase has been shown to be more susceptible than the ferrite phase to general corrosion and SCC in alkaline sulfide solution. There is a lack of understanding for the underlying SCC mechanism of DSSs. In particular, the role of electrochemical potential, passivation behavior, and solution composition on the mechanism are unclear. My work focuses on understanding the mechanism of SCC through use of electrochemical techniques, surface characterization, and mechanical testing. The results will be used for optimizing equipment design and mitigating SCC.
Lindsey Goodman

Lindsey Goodman
Materials Science & Engineering
PSE Grad Student as of Aug 2007
Graduate Research Assistant
lindsey.goodman@gatech.edu

Thesis: Stress Corrosion Cracking of Pipeline Steel in Fuel Grade Ethanol Environments

Resume

Lindsey Goodman is a PhD student in the School of Materials Science and Engineering at Georgia Tech. Her research focuses on corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking of pipeline steel. Specifically, Lindsey's thesis research is geared toward studying the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking of pipeline steel in fuel grade ethanol environments. This topic is very pertinent in the alternative fuel industry, as there is a need for an efficient method of transporting these ethanol fuels throughout the country.  Stress corrosion cracking of carbon steels has become an expensive and difficult problem in the ethanol production plants, and if the phenomenological cause of this corrosion process is determined, cracking can be mitigated or prevented in oil and gas pipelines, making ethanol transportation safer and more efficient, via pipeline.
Stephani Gulbrandsen

Stephani Gulbrandsen
Materials Science & Engineering
PSE Grad Student as of Aug 2007
Graduate Research Assistant
stephani@gatech.edu

Thesis: Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanism of 316L Stainless Steel in High Temperature Ethanolic Solutions

Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of commonly used 316L stainless steel is known to occur in high temperature ethanolic environments. The purpose of this research is to understand how water content, temperature, chloride content, and solution pH affect the SCC of the material. Slow strain rate tests will be done to assess SCC susceptibility and electrochemical measurements will be taken to characterize the system. This research will help with understanding the mechanism of SCC in high temperature ethanolic solutions for 316L stainless steel.
Joseph Meyer

Joseph Meyer
Materials Science & Engineering
PSE Grad Student as of Nov 2010
Graduate Research Assistant
jmeyer32@gmail.com

Thesis: Molten Salt Corrosion on Superheater Tubes

Molten salts act as solvents to the oxides that protect metals from corroding. With any solvent, there is a solubility limit that prevents further dissolution. Solubilities will vary between oxides and it is possible to find an ideal oxide which would minimize the fluxing effects of the molten salt. Salts, like water, are combinations of acids and bases and the activities of the conjugate acids and bases can vary similarly to pH and pOH. By varying the pNa2O of the salt, the solubility of the salt varies as well and the corrosivity of the salt can be controlled.

The project is useful because it could allow for an increase in the boiler temperature of the Kraft recovery boiler and thereby increase its efficiency. Biomass boilers like the Kraft recovery boiler are carbon neutral and will be more often used instead of fossil fuels. However, biomass boilers are less efficient than coal boilers since they are run at less than 500°C compared to nearly 600°C in their coal fired counterparts. This is all due to corrosion because the ash that accumulates on the superheater walls begins to melt and 500°C and drastically increases the corrosion rate. By reducing the solubility limit of the oxide in the molten salt, the corrosion rate can be decreased and the efficiency or lifetime of the boiler can be increased.
Robert Moser

Robert Moser
Civil & Environmental Engineering
PSE Grad Student as of Jan 2010
Graduate Research Assistant
moser@gatech.edu

Thesis: Corrosion Mitigation through High-strength Stainless Steel Prestressing Reinforcement

Resume

Robert Moser is a Ph.D. student in the School of Civil & Environmental Engineering’s Structural Engineering and Materials Group. He received his B.S. and M.S. in Civil Engineering in 2007 and 2009, respectively. Robert’s research is focused on the development of high-strength stainless steel prestressing reinforcement as a novel means to corrosion mitigation in coastal prestressed concrete bridge structures. He has experience in the fields on corrosion, mechanical testing, full-scale structural testing and monitoring, concrete material science and durability, and microstructural characterization. When not conducting his research, Robert enjoys biking, fishing, working out, ping pong, and woodworking.
Sam Raji

Sam Raji
Biomedical Engineering
B.S. Student as of 2010
Student Assistant
gth885k@gatech.edu

Thesis: Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X-65 Carbon Steel in Simulated Fuel-grade Ethanol

 

Since Jan 2010 I’ve been working at the Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST) in the materials characterization and corrosion lab under supervision of Dr. Preet Singh. My work focuses on understanding the effect of ethanol chemistry (chloride, water, pHe, and oxygen level) as well as other controlling parameters on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of X-65 carbon steel in simulated fuel-grade ethanol (SFGE).

Due to popularity and widespread of fuel-grade ethanol (FGE) as an alternative to fossil fuels this study can potentially help the pipeline industry to gather more information on environments that support SCC development and consequently can help the industry to better protect their existing products.
Tarun Sikri

Tarun VP Sikri
Materials Science & Engineering
Undergraduate Student as of 2010
tsikri3@mail.gatech.edu

Thesis: Effects of Microstructure on Localized Corrosion of Austenitic Stainless Steel in Chloride-containing Environments

 

Tarun Sikri is an undergraduate senior in the School of Materials Science & Engineering at Georgia Tech. His research focuses on how microstructure affects the localized corrosion of austenitic stainless steel in chloride-containing environments. Tarun’s thesis project includes developing a microcell attached to an optical microscope that will allow the study of pitting and intergranular corrosion at microstructural features of interest on a polished 304 stainless steel surface. A better understanding of how microstructure affects these localized corrosion processes will lead to better alloy modifications, service environments and maintenance making this class of material a more sustainable alternative.

Di Yang

Di Yang
Mechanical Engineering
PSE Grad Student as of Jan 2007
Graduate Research Assistant
Di.Yang@gatech.edu

Thesis: Cyclic Stress Effect on Stress Corrosion Cracking of Duplex Stainless Steel in Chloride and Caustic Solutions

 

My PhD study is about cyclic stress effect on stress corrosion cracking of duplex stainless steel 2205 in acidified sodium chloride solution and caustic white liquor environments. Specifically, the study is focused on quantifying the effect of loading parameters of the cyclic stresses, investigating the effect of work-hardening on stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue, and understanding the mechanisms of stress corrosion cracking in these systems.

 

Interns

Florian Ederle

Florian Ederle
University of La Rochelle, France
Intern as of Apr 2011
florian.ederle@gmail.com

Thesis: Corrosion and Materials Protection

Resume

In my current internship at the Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST), I focused on studying the effects of microstructure on hydrogen diffusion in X65 low carbon steel.  All my studies and research has been carried out under mentorship and supervision of Dr. Hamid Garmestani and Dr. Preet Singh.

One of the most controversial of all fracture related phenomena caused by exposure of high-strength steel to hydrogen (i.e. hydrogen embrittlement). Despite extensive studies, the mechanism(s) of hydrogen embrittlement have remained unclear. In my research I’ve attempted to provide the pipeline industry with better way to gather more information regarding the influence of various microstructural parameters on the global diffusion of hydrogen by using a 3D simulation model.

Yves Le Guevel

Yves Le Guevel
University of La Rochelle, France
Intern as of Apr 2011
yveslg15@hotmail.fr

Thesis: Corrosion and Materials Protections

Resume

For the past five months, I’ve been interning at the Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST) under the supervision and mentorship of Dr. Preet Singh and Dr. Hamid Garmestani.  My main area of research has been focused on the effects of microstructure on hydrogen permeation of X-65 carbon steel.

My findings can potentially provide a better understanding of hydrogen permeation behavior (absorption, diffusion, trapping, etc.) and its impact on hydrogen embrittlement of pipeline steels under high gaseous pressures and it can potentially lead in to developing a technical basis and guidelines to ensure structural integrity and safety of H2 pipelines.

Michel Mbadinga

Michel Mbadinga
University of La Rochelle, France
Intern as of Apr 2011
Cesar.lemechec@hotmail.fr

Thesis: Corrosion and Materials Protection

Resume

I’m currently interning at the Institute of Paper Science and Technology (IPST) in the materials characterization and corrosion lab under supervision of Dr. Preet Singh. My recent work focuses on characterizing the corrosivity of bio-oils, such as extraction liquors from Loblolly Pine and pyrolysis oils from softwood and oak, on Duplex Stainless Steels (DSSs), Austenitic Stainless Steels (ASSs), Carbon Steel, copper, brass and Aluminum.

As part of this study I’m interested in understanding the effects of pretreatment of extraction liquors at low and high temperature on corrosion through use of electrochemical techniques and define the main role play by lignocellulosic materials of pyrolysis oils on DSSs, ASSs, Carbon steel, copper, Brass, and Aluminum corrosion through the immersing exposure, electrochemical techniques. The results from my project potentially have direct and positive effects on the pulp and paper industry and production of biofuels.

 

Alumni

 

Adolfo Anaya
PhD

Thesis:  

 
 

Stefanie Asher
PhD

Thesis:  

 
 

Gustaf Beck
PhD

Thesis:  

 
 

Vikas Behrani
PhD
Senior Process Engineer, Patterning
Portland Technology Development
Intel Coporation
vikas.behrani@intel.com

Thesis:  

 
Ananya Bhattacharya

Ananya Bhattacharya
PhD
kevin.chasse@mse.gatech.edu

Thesis:  

 
 

Anthony Calandra
PhD

Thesis:  

 
 

Andrew Colburn
PhD

Thesis:  

 
 

Patrick Hazlewood
PhD

Thesis:  

 
Xiaoyuan Lou

Xiaoyuan Lou
PhD

Thesis:  

 
 

Chris Malinski
PhD

Thesis:  

 
 

Katie Mencke
PhD

Thesis:  

 
 

Krista Pallay
PhD

Thesis:  

 
 

Shital Patel
PhD

Thesis:  

 
 

Jonathan Sugalski
PhD

Thesis:  

 
Matthew Taylor

Matthew Taylor
PhD

Thesis:  


 

 
 

Dong Yang
PhD

Thesis:  
 

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